Upper School Courses

English 9 (2 semesters)

Studies have shown that individuals who often read high quality fiction appear to be better able to understand other people, empathize with them, and view the world from their perspective. That is our goal in this this yearlong high school level class! We will read literature as an expression of those higher things that make us most human: our emotions, our recognition of the need for a moral order, and our ability to experience the beauty of the human existence. We will discuss theme, symbolism, motif, and which characters we like and which ones we don’t and exactly why.

We will spend a significant amount of time on honing writing skills. For some of this class we will focus on what people usually picture when they think of writing for the real world: writing a review of a play or a movie, or writing a newspaper article. For most of this class we will focus on writing to be successful in college, the typical 3-5 page essay that your English 101 professor expects.

As we progress through our year, we will be exploring the theme of upstanders vs. bystanders, what it means to be an upstander, which characters in literature are upstanders, and how can we be upstanders ourselves. In this year-long course, we will delve into the classic literary works by authors such as Harper Lee, George Orwell, William Golding, Arthur Miller, and more.

Students are expected to participate in this online course similar to a brick-and-mortar class by logging in several times weekly, completing assignments on time, and interacting regularly with teachers and peers.

(UC a-g credit )
English 10 (2 semesters)

This course presents students with literature and text that convey values, emotions, and truths about the human condition. The course teaches skills that serve as the necessary basis for further learning and career development, which enrich the human spirit, foster responsible citizenship, and preserve the common literary heritage of our culture. Students are expected to participate in this online course similar to a brick-and-mortar class by logging in daily, completing assignments on time, and interacting regularly with teachers and peers.

(UC a-g credit )
English 11 (2 semesters)

Studies have shown that individuals who often read high quality fiction appear to be better able to understand other people, empathize with them, and view the world from their perspective. That is our goal in this this yearlong high school level class! We will read literature as an expression of those higher things that make us most human: our emotions, our recognition of the need for a moral order, and our ability to experience the beauty of the human existence. We will discuss theme, symbolism, motif, and which characters we like and which ones we don’t and exactly why. English 11 will focus on reading works created by American writers, including John Steinbeck, Arthur Miller, Zora Neale Hurston, Ernest Hemingway, and others.

We will spend a significant amount of time on honing writing skills. For some of this class we will focus on what people usually picture when they think of writing for the real world: writing a review of a play or a movie, or writing a newspaper article. For most of this class we will focus on writing to be successful in college, the typical 3-5 page essay that your English 101 professor expects.

(UC a-g credit )
English 12 (2 semesters)

Learners in English 12 will engage in functional literacy and technical writing. Both MLA and APA styles will be explored and assessed in this course. In addition, students are immersed in a chronological and critical study of the English language and the evolution of literary forms. Students will focus on classic European and American literature, identifying differences in perception and interpretation. Students are also expected to analyze and evaluate pertinent themes and topics aligned to the greater goals of European and American social study. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance. All Content is aligned with the Common Core Standards for English.

(UC a-g credit )

Middle School Courses

Crazy Creatures of the Depths (1 quarter)

In this eight week class on Crazy, Creepy Creatures of the Seas, you will learn to identify the central ideas of a text and how those are developed. By the end of this course you will be able to analyze and support these ideas with evidence from the texts you will be reading on the odd, mysterious creatures found in the world’s oceans. Additionally we will discuss how these real life creatures influence myths and legends of monsters, mermaids, and other not-so-real life forms.. This class uses a variety of online sources to help you acquire these skills. You will need access to a computer, an email address, and the desire to learn more about what lurks at the bottom of the oceans. Project based assessments are used to determine your understanding of the course requirements.

Magical Words (1 quarter)
Teacher: Alexa Hale

In this course, you will begin your adventure into the magical world of Harry Potter! This online course serves as a novel study that will explore the first book in the series: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. This online course can also serve as a novel study to support another online course: The Allusionist. Throughout our 8 weeks together we will read Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone as well as cover the following:

  • understand and explain the development of a story
  • analyze the word choice of an author
  • character analysis
  • analyze how elements within a story fit into the overall plot
  • argumentative writing
  • informative/ explanatory writing
  • narrative writing
  • compare and contrast

To learn more about the overall story line of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, please click below:
http://harrypotter.scholastic.com/sorcerers_stone/

Strange Happenings in Short Stories (1 quarter)

In this eight week class on Strange Happenings in Short Stories, you will learn to read, analyze, and respond to a theme in literature academically.  As you read these stories of strange happenings in the future, you will demonstrate your understanding of the plots and themes of various science fiction short stories by Ray Bradbury through written and project based assessments. Written assessments will emphasize a literary response using the formal aspects of essay writing.  Emphasis is on the use of MLA style, literary analysis, and the formal structure of an essay. Project based assessments will give you the opportunity to show not only your understanding of the course requirements, but also your creativity and individuality. This class uses a variety of online sources to help you acquire these skills. You will need access to a computer, an email address, and the desire to learn more about how strange happenings in the realm of technology can shape your world.

Frankly Cautionary: Fables, Fairy Tales and Fear (1 quarter)

In this eight week class entitled Frankly Cautionary:  Fables, Fairy Tales and Fears you will learn how to draw inferences from a text, summarize the theme or central idea, use a plot diagram to enhance your understanding, and determine examples of figurative language while reading a series of cautionary tales written by Aesop, Hans Christian Andersen, The Brothers Grimm and others.  Written and Project based assessments are used to determine your understanding of the course requirements.  After successfully completing this course you will earn the Frankly Cautionary Tales badge.

How Gods and Monsters Made the World (1 quarter)
Teacher: Kate Wolfe

You may know about Percy Jackson, but did you know that pretty much every culture in the world has its own version of how things came to be? That includes having their own myths, legends, gods and monsters. In this course, we will read creation stories that come from Native American culture, the Vikings, Africa, India, China, Japan, Australia and Greece. As we do that, we learn about the history and the cultures of the people who told these stories. Learning about stories and where they come from is a great way to develop reading and writing skills, and so we will be practicing how to create an argument, prove a point and identify important parts of a story.  The class coursework also offers students the opportunity to learn how to research online, identify elements of plot and express themselves in a strong, articulate manner.

The Master of Horror: Edgar Allan Poe (1 quarter)
Teacher: Kate Wolfe

Do you love a good ghost story? Maybe you’re addicted to suspense and mystery. If so, then this course is for you! We will use the short stories and poetry of Edgar Allan Poe to learn about where all those dark and mysterious plot elements you love come from. Students will also develop critical thinking, writing and analytical skills. We will explore elements of plot and practice creating an argument supported with evidence. We will also be doing some research on Poe and the time he lived, and as part of that research, students will learn how to evaluate sources and extract important information.

The Making of a Hero: Myth and Adventure in The Odyssey (1 quarter)
Teacher: Kate Wolfe

Much of what we know about Greek myth comes from Homer’s famous epic poem, The Odyssey. Anyone who is interested in gods, goddesses and heroes will love to read the original story! As we read Homer’s epic, students will develop thinking and writing skills by looking at what the poem reveals about cultural values and the makings of a hero.